My name is Farida and I’m 30 years old. I moved to Germany from Kazan, Russia when I was 18 years old. Back at home, I studied German and when an opportunity came to go to Germany as an au pair, I took it. After that year, I studied for a long time at the University of Heidelberg and then moved to Berlin for work, where I actually reside now. I am a freelancer and I work on various projects. I’m a copywriter and translator. Sometimes I am a language teacher, interim manager, but often I just want to sit back and do nothing. In my spare time I write for my blog about my favourite city Berlin.

What is it that you like/dislike in Germany?

Likes: freedom of movement and the absence of external pressure from the society towards women=marriage +children +apartment+ immediately. You can be relaxed here.

Sometimes I dislike some innate rightness in Germans. It’s not a bad thing, it’s a character trait, and one needs to get used to. I dislike that in my mailbox I don’t find romantic letters, but numerous bills and notifications instead.

Is the concept of nationality important to you?

Difficult question: I am from Russia, but will not call myself Russian. I am Tatar. I grew up in Kazan, where two cultures, two languages, two religions, two traditions that actually have almost nothing in common except the fact that they have been coexisting over the past few centuries and, in general, rather peacefully.

Does the nationality matter to me? Not really, we are all humans. I’ve learnt since my childhood not to pay attention to nationalities. Of course, certain cultures determine certain human behaviour, e.g. Germans are precise, Spanish are, vice versa, always late and incredibly talkative and so on. But nationality per se does not affect my attitude towards humans!

Where is home for you?

I ask myself the same question since I left Kazan. Home is probably a place where you have friends, work, love… Your home is not always your home country.

What is for you multicoolty?

Multicoolty is Berlin.


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